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English definition of “bring”

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bring

verb [T] uk   /brɪŋ/ (brought, brought) us  

bring verb [T] (TOWARDS PLACE)

A2 to take or carry someone or something to a place or a person, or in the direction of the person speaking: "Shall I bring anything to the party?" "Oh, just a bottle." [+ two objects] Bring me that knife/Bring that knife to me. Can you help me bring in the shopping (= take it into the house)? The police brought several men in for questioning (= took them to the police station because they might have been involved in a crime). When they visit us they always bring their dog with them.
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bring verb [T] (CAUSE)

B1 to cause, result in, or produce a state or condition: [+ two objects] She's brought us so much happiness over the years. [+ -ing verb] The explosion brought the whole building crashing to the ground. Several trees were brought down (= made to fall) by the storm. The closure of the factory brought poverty to the town (= resulted in it becoming poor). Bring the water to the boil (= make it start boiling). She suddenly brought the interview to an end. Her tragic story brought tears to my eyes (= made me cry). What will the future bring for these refugees?bring sb to sth to cause someone to come to a particular place or thing: This subject brings me to the second part of the discussion. What brings you (= why have you come) to Miami?
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bring verb [T] (LAW)

to make or begin as part of an official legal process: He was arrested for fighting, but the police have decided not to bring charges.
(Definition of bring from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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