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English definition of “but”

but

conjunction uk   strong /bʌt/ weak /bət/ us  
A1 used to introduce an added statement, usually something that is different from what you have said before: She's very hard-working but not very imaginative. This is not caused by evil, but by simple ignorance. The play's good, but not that good - I've seen better. I'm sorry, but I think you're wrong when you say she did it deliberately. Call me old-fashioned, but I like handwritten letters. I can understand his unhappiness. But to attempt suicide! "She said she's leaving." "But why?" You can invite Keith to the party, but please don't ask that friend of his. We must not complain about the problem, but (= instead we must) help to put it right. She's not a painter but a writer (= she is a writer, not a painter). She's not only a painter but also a writer (= she is both). He said he hadn't been there, but then (= it is not surprising that) he would say that. I think it's true, but then (= it should be understood that), I'm no expert.

but

preposition, conjunction uk   strong /bʌt/ weak /bət/ us  
B1 except: Eventually, all but one of them promised to come to his leaving party. He's anything but violent (= not violent in any way). I'd have crashed the car but for your warning. This is the last episode but one (= one before the last) of this drama serial. She's one of those guests who does nothing but complain. This car has been nothing but trouble - it's always breaking down!

but

but

noun uk   strong /bʌt/ weak /bət/ us  
no buts (about it) used to emphasize that something will happen even if the person you are talking to does not want it to: We're going to visit your aunt tomorrow and there'll be no buts about it.
(Definition of but from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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