cast Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "cast" - English Dictionary

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castnoun

uk   /kɑːst/  us   /kæst/

cast noun (ACTORS)

B2 [C, + sing/pl verb] the actors in a film, play, or show: After the final performance the director threw a party for the cast. Part of the movie's success lies in the strength of the supporting cast (= the actors who were not playing the main parts).

cast noun (SHAPE)

[C] an object made by pouring hot liquid into a container and leaving it to become solid [C] a plaster cast in a cast (UK also in plaster) If a part of your body is in a cast, it has a plaster cast around it to protect it while a broken bone repairs itself: My leg was in a cast for about six weeks.

castverb

uk   /kɑːst/  us   /kæst/ (cast, cast)

cast verb (ACTORS)

C2 [T] to choose actors to play particular parts in a play, film, or show: He was often cast as the villain. In her latest movie she was cast against type (= played a different character than the one she usually played or might be expected to play).figurative They like to cast the opposing political party as (= to say that they are) the party of high taxes.
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cast verb (LIGHT)

C2 [T usually + adv/prep] to send light or shadow (= an area of darkness) in a particular direction: The moon cast a white light into the room. The tree cast a shadow over/on his face.figurative Her arrival cast a shadow over/on the party (= made it less pleasant).cast light on sth to provide an explanation for a situation or problem, or information that makes it easier to understand: The discovery of the dinosaur skeleton has cast light on why they became extinct.

cast verb (LOOK)

cast a look, glance, smile, etc. to look, smile, etc. in a particular direction: She cast a quick look in the rear mirror.cast an/your eye over sth to look quickly at something: Could you cast an eye over this report for me?

cast verb (THROW)

[T + adv/prep] literary to throw something: The knight cast the sword far out into the lake. [I or T] (in fishing) to throw something, such as a line, into the water to catch fish with: He cast the line to the middle of the river.

cast verb (DOUBT)

cast doubt/suspicion on sb/sth C2 to make people feel less sure about or have less trust in something or someone: New evidence has cast doubt on the guilty verdict.cast aspersions on sb/sth formal to criticize or make damaging remarks or judgments about someone or something: His opponents cast aspersions on his patriotism.

cast verb (REMEMBER)

cast your mind back C2 to try to remember: If you cast your mind back, you might recall that I never promised to go.

cast verb (VOTE)

cast a/your vote C2 to vote: All the votes in the election have now been cast and the counting has begun.

cast verb (SHAPE)

[T] to make an object by pouring hot liquid, such as melted metal, into a shaped container where it becomes hard

cast verb (MAGIC)

cast a spell C2 to use words thought to be magic, especially in order to have an effect on someone: The old woman cast a spell on the prince and he turned into a frog.figurative When I was 17, jazz cast its spell on me (= I started to like it very much).

cast verb (SKIN)

[T] If a snake casts its skin, the outer layer of old skin comes off its body.
(Definition of cast from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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