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English definition of “clearance”

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clearance

noun uk   /ˈklɪə.rəns/ us    /ˈklɪr.əns/

clearance noun (REMOVE)

[S or U] the process of removing waste or things you do not want from a place: slum clearance UK They specialize in house clearances after a resident has died.

clearance noun (CHEAP SALE)

[U] an occasion when goods are offered for sale cheaply so that people will be encouraged to buy them and there will be space for new goods: We bought our new carpet at a clearance sale. US I buy Christmas decorations when they go on clearance in January

clearance noun (NOT TOUCHING)

[C or U] the distance or space that is needed for one thing to avoid touching another thing: It was difficult getting the piano through the doorway because we only had a clearance of a few centimetres. High vehicles should take an alternative route because of low clearance under the bridge.

clearance noun (OFFICIAL PERMISSION)

[U] official permission for something or the state of having satisfied the official conditions of something: The plane will be taking off as soon as it gets clearance. To visit the prison, you'll need security clearance.

clearance noun (CHEQUE)

[U] the process of a cheque going from one bank to another through a central organization, so that money can be paid to the person it is owed to: Clearance (of a cheque) can take up to a week.

clearance noun (SPORT)

[C] in football, an occasion when a player kicks the ball away from their goal: Robinson's long clearance was controlled by Mido who went on to score.
(Definition of clearance from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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