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English definition of “click”

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click

verb uk   /klɪk/ us  

click verb (OPERATE COMPUTER)

A2 [I or T] to carry out a computer operation by pressing a button on the mouse: If you want to open a file, click twice on the icon for it. When you have selected the file you want, click the "Open" box.
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click verb (MAKE SOUND)

C2 [I or T] to make a short, sharp sound, or to make something do this: The door clicked shut behind her. Can you hear that strange clicking noise? UK Paul clicked his fingers (= moved his thumb against his middle finger to make a short sharp sound) to attract the waiter's attention. Soldiers click their heels (= bring them sharply together) when they stand to attention.

click verb (BECOME FRIENDLY)

C2 [I] informal to become friendly or popular: Liz and I really clicked the first time we met. The new daytime soap opera has yet to show signs that it's clicking with the television audience.

click verb (BECOME CLEAR)

C2 [I] informal to be understood, or become clear suddenly: Suddenly everything clicked and I realized where I'd met him. [+ question word] As he talked about his schooldays, it suddenly clicked where I had met him before. [+ that] So it's finally clicked that you're going to have to get yourself a job, has it? In the last act of the play, everything clicks into place.

click

noun [C] uk   /klɪk/ us  

click noun [C] (SOUND)

a short, sharp sound: The soldier gave a click of his heels as he saluted.

click noun [C] (COMPUTER OPERATION)

A2 the act of pressing a button on the mouse (= small control device) of a computer to operate it
(Definition of click from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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