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English definition of “climb”

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climb

verb uk   /klaɪm/ us  

climb verb (RISE)

B2 [I] to go up, or to go towards the top of something: The plane climbed quickly to a height of 30,000 feet. As it leaves the village, the road climbs steeply up the mountain. The sun climbed higher in the sky.A2 [I or T] to use your legs, or your legs and hands, to go up or onto the top of something: to climb the stairs/mountain I hate climbing ladders. We're going climbing (= climbing mountains as a sport) in Scotland next weekend. [I] If a price, number, or amount climbs, it increases: Our costs have climbed rapidly in the last few years. [I] to move into a higher social position, or to improve your position at work: He quickly climbed to the top of his profession.
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climb verb (MOVE)

B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to move into or out of a small space awkwardly or with difficulty or effort: They climbed into the truck and drove away. We can't stop Tom climbing out of his cot.
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climb verb (GROW)

[I] to grow upwards: There's masses of ivy climbing up/over the walls of our house.
Phrasal verbs

climb

noun [C] uk   /klaɪm/ us  
an act or process of climbing: We were very tired after our climb. The climb down the mountain took longer than the climb up. I've made three climbs so far this year. Her climb to power has been very rapid. a place or object to be climbed: The north face of the Eiger is a very difficult climb.
(Definition of climb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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