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English definition of “close”

close

verb uk   /kləʊz/ us    /kloʊz/

close verb (NOT OPEN)

A1 [I or T] to (cause something to) change from being open to not being open: Could you close the door/window please? Close your eyes - I've got a surprise for you. A2 [I] When a shop, restaurant, or public place closes, people cannot go into it: The banks had closed (to customers) so I couldn't get any money out. The museum closes at 5.30. We can't get a drink! It's after (pub) closing time.

close verb (END)

C2 [I or T] to (cause something to) end: The play closed with the tragic death of both hero and heroine. She closed the meeting with a short speech. The pound closed at (= was worth) $1.47 at the end of the day's trading. B2 [I or T] to (cause a business, organization, or business arrangement to) stop operating: I closed that bank account when I came to London. The factory closed over ten years ago. close a deal to make a successful business arrangement with someone: We closed a deal with a major supermarket.

close

noun uk   us  

close noun (END)

  /kləʊz/    /kloʊz/ [S] the end of something, or the time when you end it: I tried to bring the conversation to a close. "Let's draw this meeting to a close, gentlemen," said the chairman.

close noun (ROAD)

  /kləʊs/    /kloʊs/ [C] UK a road, usually with private houses, which vehicles can only enter from one end: He lives at 83 Barker Close.

close

adjective uk   /kləʊs/ us    /kloʊs/

close adjective (RELATIONSHIP)

B1 having direct family connections or shared beliefs, support, and sympathy: There weren't many people at the funeral - just close family/relatives. They're a worrying political party because of their close links/ties with terrorist groups. In those early months, there's a very close bond between mother and child. a close community A2 describes people who know each other very well and like each other a lot, or who see and talk to each other a lot: Mira is one of my closest friends. Her relationship isn't good with her father, but she's very close to her mother. My brother and I have become much closer over the years.

close adjective (CAREFUL)

C2 looking at or listening to someone or something very carefully: Police are paying close attention to the situation. Take a closer look at this photograph.

close adjective (SECRETIVE)

unwilling to talk about things to other people: He's so close about his past - it seems like he's hiding something.

close adjective (LACKING AIR)

describes weather or air conditions in which it is difficult to breathe and it is uncomfortably warm: Can I open the window? It's very close in here.

close

adjective, adverb uk   /kləʊs/ us    /kloʊs/

close adjective, adverb (NEAR)

A1 not far in position or time: Don't get too close to that dog, Rosie. I hate people standing too close to me. As Christmas gets closer, the shops get more and more crowded. Emma looked close to tears (= almost going to cry). close by near: Shall we call in on Miranda? You know she lives quite close by.

close adjective, adverb (SIMILAR)

C1 having only a small difference: The election results were so close they had to vote again. He came second in the race, but it was very close. The youngest boys are so close in age they look like twins. Both children bear a very close resemblance to their father. close on/to almost: I think there are close on three million unemployed at present.
(Definition of close from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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