club definition, meaning - what is club in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “club”

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club

noun uk   us   /klʌb/

club noun (GROUP)

A2 [C, + sing/pl verb] an organization of people with a common purpose or interest, who meet regularly and take part in shared activities: I've just joined the local golf/squash/tennis club. Visitors must be accompanied by club members.B1 [C, + sing/pl verb] a team: The Orioles are an exciting club this year. Stockport County Football Club [C] a building in which a club meets
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club noun (DANCE)

B1 [C] a place that people go to in order to dance and drink in the evening: I went to that new club that's just opened.
Synonym

club noun (GOLF)

[C] a long, thin stick used in golf to hit the ball: a set of golf clubs

club noun (WEAPON)

[C] a heavy stick used as a weapon

club noun (CARD)

clubs [plural or U] one of the four suits in playing cards, which has one or more black symbols with three round leaves: the three/King of clubs [C] a playing card from the suit of clubs: Now you have to play a club if you have one.

club

verb [T] uk   us   /klʌb/ (-bb-)
to beat a person or an animal, usually repeatedly, with a heavy stick or object: He was clubbed over the head. The alligators are then clubbed to death.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of club from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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