come down definition, meaning - what is come down in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “come down”

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come down

phrasal verb with come uk   us   /kʌm/ verb (came, come)

(LAND)

B2 to fall and land on the ground: A lot of trees came down in the storm. Our plane came down in a field. The snow came down during the night.
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(LOWER LEVEL)

B2 If a price or a level comes down, it becomes lower: House prices have come down recently. Inflation is coming down. informal to feel less excited after a very enjoyable experience: The whole weekend was so wonderful I haven't come down yet.
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(SUPPORT)

[+ adv/prep] to decide that you support a particular person or side in an argument, etc.: The government has come down on the side of military action.

(DRUGS)

informal If a person comes down from a drug, they stop feeling its effects.

(UNIVERSITY)

UK old-fashioned If you come down (from a college or university, especially Oxford or Cambridge University), you leave your studies either permanently or for a short time.

(TRAVEL SOUTH)

to go to a place that is south of where you live: My boyfriend's coming down from Scotland this weekend. They don't come down to London much because it's too tiring with the kids.
(Definition of come down from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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