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English definition of “come on”

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come on

verb uk phrasal verb with come   /kʌm/ (came, come) us  

(START)

C1 to start to happen or work: The heating comes on at six in the morning. If you have an illness coming on, it is starting gradually: I think I've got a cold coming on. UK informal If a woman comes on, her period (= the blood coming from the womb that happens every month) starts.
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(ENCOURAGE)

B1 said to encourage someone to do something, especially to hurry or try harder, or to tell you something: Come on - we're going to be late if you don't hurry! Come on, Helen, you can tell me. I won't tell anyone.

(SEXUAL INTEREST)

informal to make your sexual interest known to someone: Then his wife left the room and he started coming on to me. She was coming on strong and, naturally, I responded.

(APPEAR)

(of an actor) to walk onto the stage: There was great applause when the Russian ballerina came on.

(NOT BELIEVE)

informal used to tell someone that you do not believe them or that you disagree with them, or to show that you are angry with them: Oh come on, Kylie, you made the same excuse last week!
(Definition of come on phrasal verb, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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