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English definition of “comfort”

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comfort

noun uk   /ˈkʌm.fət/ us    /-fɚt/

comfort noun (NO PAIN)

B1 [U] a pleasant feeling of being relaxed and free from pain: She evidently dresses for comfort. It's a little too hot for comfort. Now you can watch the latest films in the comfort of your own room.
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comfort noun (FOR SADNESS)

C2 [C or U] the state of feeling better after feeling sad or worried, or something that makes you feel better in this way: The letters that people wrote after his death gave me a lot of comfort. It's some comfort to his wife (= it makes her feel less sad) to know that he died instantly and didn't suffer. I've got to take an exam too, if it's any comfort (= if it makes you feel better to know that we share the same problem or bad luck). I know she goes out a lot at night, but I draw/take comfort from the fact that she's always with friends. He's a great comfort to his mother.

comfort noun (ENOUGH MONEY)

C2 [U] the state of having a pleasant life with enough money for everything that you need: He could retire now and live in comfort for the rest of his life.

comfort noun (PLEASANT THING)

C1 [C usually plural] something that makes your life easy and pleasant: After the trip, it was nice getting back to a few home comforts. She's always liked her creature comforts (= the type of pleasure found in the house, for example warmth, food, etc.).

comfort

verb [T] uk   /ˈkʌm.fət/ us    /-fɚt/
C2 to make someone feel better when they are sad or worried: The girl's mother was at home today, being comforted by relatives.
(Definition of comfort from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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