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English definition of “common”

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common

adjective uk   /ˈkɒm.ən/ us    /ˈkɑː.mən/

common adjective (USUAL)

B1 the same in a lot of places or for a lot of people: It's quite common to see couples who dress alike. "Smith" is a very common name in Britain.common courtesy/decency the basic level of politeness that you expect from someonecommon knowledge B2 a fact that everyone knows: [+ that] It's common knowledge that they live together.
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common adjective (SHARED)

B1 belonging to or shared by two or more people, or things: a common goal/interest English has some features common to many languages.
See also
for the common good If something is done for the common good, it is done to help everyone.make common cause with sb formal to act together with someone in order to achieve something: Environmental protesters have made common cause with local people to stop the motorway being built.
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common adjective (LOW CLASS)

disapproving typical of a low social class: My mum thinks dyed blonde hair is a bit common.

common

noun uk   /ˈkɒm.ən/ us    /ˈkɑː.mən/

common noun (LAND)

[C] ( US also commons) an area of grass that everyone is allowed to use, usually in or near a village

common noun (SHARED)

have sth in common B1 to share interests, experiences, or other characteristics with someone or something: We don't really have much in common.in common with sb/sth C1 in the same way as someone or something: In common with many mothers, she feels torn between her family and her work.
(Definition of common from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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