compose definition, meaning - what is compose in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “compose”

See all translations

compose

verb uk   /kəmˈpəʊz/  us   /-ˈpoʊz/

compose verb (PRODUCE ART)

B2 [I or T] to produce music, poetry, or formal writing: Prokofiev started composing at the age of five. The music was specially composed for the film. a piece of music composed for the flute He composed this poem for his wife.formal My lawyer is going to compose a letter of complaint.

compose verb (FORM)

be composed of sth B2 to be formed from various things: Air is composed mainly of nitrogen and oxygen. The committee is composed of MPs, doctors, academics and members of the public. The audience was composed largely of young people. [T] to be the parts that something is made of: At that time, women composed only 1.6 percent of the US forces.

compose verb (BECOME CALM)

compose yourself to make yourself calm again after being angry or upset: She finally stopped crying and composed herself.compose your features/thoughts to try to make yourself look or feel calm after being angry or upset: I tried to compose my features into a smile. He took a minute or two to compose his thoughts before he replied.

compose verb (ARRANGE TEXT)

[T] specialized publishing to arrange words, sentences, pages, etc. in preparation for printing
(Definition of compose from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of compose?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “compose” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

selfless

caring more for what other people need and want rather than for what you yourself need and want

Word of the Day

She’s got very good posture. (How we stand and sit)

by Kate Woodford,
May 27, 2015
Recently on this blog, we looked at the words that we use to describe the way we move. This week we’re looking at words for describing our bodies when they are still, whether we are standing or sitting. Since most of us do far too much of this, let’s start with sitting.

Read More 

ebolaphobia noun

June 01, 2015
irrational fear of the (spread of) the Ebola virus Ebolaphobia Going Viral

Read More