coordinate definition, meaning - what is coordinate in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “coordinate”

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coordinate

verb uk   /kəʊˈɔː.dɪ.neɪt/  us   /koʊˈɔːr-/

coordinate verb (COMBINE)

[T] (UK also co-ordinate) to make various different things work effectively as a whole: We need someone to coordinate the whole campaign. A number of charities are coordinating their efforts to distribute food to the region.

coordinate verb (MATCH)

[I] to match or look attractive together: The bed linen coordinates with the bedroom curtains. a coordinating jacket and skirt

coordinate

noun uk   /kəʊˈɔː.dɪ.nət/  us   /koʊˈɔːr-/

coordinate noun (POSITION)

[C usually plural] one of a pair of numbers and/or letters that show the exact position of a point on a map or graph

coordinate noun (CLOTHES)

coordinates [plural] clothes, especially for women, that are made in matching colours or styles so that they can be worn together
Translations of “coordinate”
in Arabic يُنسّق…
in Korean 조직하다, 편성하다…
in Malaysian menyelaraskan…
in Turkish etken çalışmayı düzenlemek, ayarlamak, koordine etmek…
in Italian coordinare…
in Chinese (Traditional) 聯合, 協調, 使相配合…
in Russian координировать…
in Polish koordynować…
in Vietnamese phối hợp…
in Spanish coordinar…
in Portuguese coordenar…
in Thai ทำให้ประสานกัน…
in Catalan coordinar…
in Japanese ~を調整する…
in Indonesian menyelaraskan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 联合, 协调, 使相配合…
(Definition of coordinate from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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