copy definition, meaning - what is copy in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “copy”

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copy

verb [I or T] uk   /ˈkɒp.i/  us   /ˈkɑː.pi/

copy verb [I or T] (PRODUCE)

A2 to produce something so that it is the same as an original piece of work: They've copied the basic design from the Japanese model and added a few of their own refinements. Patricia's going to copy her novel onto disk and send it to me.disapproving He was always copying from/off other children (= cheating by copying), but never got caught.
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copy verb [I or T] (BEHAVE)

B2 to behave, dress, speak, etc. in a way that is intended to be like someone else, for example, because you admire that person: He tends to copy his brother in the way he dresses.
copy and paste If you copy and paste something on a computer screen, you move it from one area to another.

copy

noun uk   /ˈkɒp.i/  us   /ˈkɑː.pi/

copy noun (VERSION)

B1 [C] something that has been made to be exactly like something else: This painting is only a copy - the original hangs in the Louvre. I always keep a copy of any official or important letters that I send off. Could you make a copy of (= use a special machine to copy) this for tomorrow's meeting, please?B2 [C] a single book, newspaper, record, or other printed or recorded text of which many have been produced: Do you have a copy of last Saturday's Times, by any chance?
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copy noun (TEXT)

[U] written text that is to be printed, or text that is intended to help with the sale of a product: We need someone who can write good copy for our publicity department.
(Definition of copy from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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