correct Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of "correct" - English Dictionary

See all translations

correctadjective

uk   us   /kəˈrekt/
A2 in agreement with the true facts or with what is generally accepted: a correct answer "Is that the correct spelling?" "I don't know - look it up in a dictionary." It's not correct to describe them as "students".formal "Your name is Angela Black?" "That is correct."
Synonym
Opposite
B1 taking or showing great care to behave or speak in a way that is generally accepted and approved of: He's very correct in his dress/speech/manner, isn't he?
More examples
correctly
adverb uk   us   /-li/
B1 Have I pronounced your name correctly?
correctness
noun [U] uk   us   /-nəs/
He speaks with such correctness (= care) that it sometimes sounds very formal.

correctverb [T]

uk   us   /kəˈrekt/
B2 to show or tell someone that something is wrong and to make it right: Students said it was helpful if the teacher corrected their pronunciation. I've got 30 exam papers to correct. If a medical treatment corrects a particular condition, it cures the condition or makes it easier to manage: glasses to correct poor vision a chair that corrects bad posturecorrect me if I'm wrong but... said as a polite and slightly formal way of disagreeing with someone: Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think we arranged the meeting for the 12 December.
(Definition of correct from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of correct?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “correct” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
stretch the truth

to say something that is not completely honest in order to make someone or something seem better than it really is

Word of the Day

July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
by Liz Walter,
July 01, 2015
With the USA’s Independence Day on the 4th and France’s Bastille Day on the 14th, July certainly has a revolutionary theme, so this blog looks at words and phrases we use to talk about the dramatic and nation-changing events that these days celebrate. In particular, it focuses on one of the most

Read More 

generation pause noun
generation pause noun
July 06, 2015
informal young adults who are not able to do things previously typical for their age group such as buy a home or start a family because of lack of money Meanwhile, a new study released last week revealed a quarter of Brits believe they’ll never own a property, leading them to be

Read More