course definition, meaning - what is course in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “course”

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course

noun uk   /kɔːs/  us   /kɔːrs/

course noun (CLASSES)

A1 [C] a set of classes or a plan of study on a particular subject, usually leading to an exam or qualification: Tim did a three-year course in linguistics at Newcastle. They're going away on a training course next week. I'd like to do (US take) a writing course when I retire.
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course noun (SPORTS AREA)

B1 [C] an area of land or water used for a sports event: a golf course/cross-country course
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course noun (DEVELOPMENT)

C1 [S] the often gradual development of something, or the way something happens, or a way of doing something: Did the scandal have any effect on the course of the election? In the course of (= during) the interview it became clear that he was not suitable for the job. What would be an appropriate course (of action) in such a situation? If our rivals are spending more on advertising, we'll have to follow the same course. The defendants are also accused of attempting to pervert the course of justice.in the course of time UK after a period of time: I assume they plan to have children in the course of time.in/with the course of time gradually: With the course of time, I've learned to live with my disability.
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course noun (DIRECTION)

C1 [C usually singular, U] the direction in which a vehicle, especially an aircraft, spacecraft, or ship, moves, or the path along which a river flows: The pilot avoided a collision by changing course. Changing the course of the river would cause serious environmental damage to the whole valley.figurative The debate completely changed course after Liz made her speech.on course likely to happen, or likely to succeed as planned: Because of the recession, we're on course for/to have record unemployment levels.
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course noun (MEAL)

A2 [C] a part of a meal that is served separately from the other parts: a four-course lunch A traditional British main course consists of a meat dish with potatoes and other vegetables.
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course noun (MEDICAL TREATMENT)

[C] a fixed number of regular medical treatments: My doctor's put me on a course of antibiotics. She needed a six-month course of physiotherapy after she broke her leg.

course noun (LAYER)

[C] specialized architecture a continuous horizontal layer of bricks or other building material

course

verb [I usually + adv/prep] uk   /kɔːs/  us   /kɔːrs/ formal
to flow quickly or in large amounts: Tears were coursing down his cheeks. You could almost hear the blood coursing through her veins as she passed the finishing line.figurative A new wave of idealism is coursing through our schools.
(Definition of course from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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