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English definition of “curl”

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curl

noun uk   /kɜːl/ us    /kɝːl/
[C or U] a piece of hair that grows or has been formed into a curving shape, or something that is the same shape as this: tight/loose curls Her hair fell in curls over her shoulders. Curls of smoke were rising from the chimney.
Compare
[C or U] the curved shape in which a ball moves when it is hit or kicked in a particular way: The curl on the shot sent it looping around the keeper into the far corner of the net.

curl

verb [I or T] uk   /kɜːl/ us    /kɝːl/
to make something into the shape of a curl, or to grow or change into this shape: Does your hair curl naturally, or is it permed? A new baby will automatically curl its fingers round any object it touches. to make a ball move in a curved shape by hitting or kicking it in a particular way: He curled the ball into the top right hand corner.curl your lip to show by an upward movement of one side of your mouth that you feel no respect for something or someone: Her lip curled at what he said.
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “curl”
in Korean 동그랗게 말린 컬…
in Arabic التِفاف, تَجَعُّد…
in French friser, s’enrouler…
in Turkish bukle, kıvırcık…
in Italian ricciolo, spirale (di fumo)…
in Chinese (Traditional) 鬈髮, 捲曲物,螺旋狀物…
in Russian локон, завиток…
in Polish lok…
in Spanish rizar, enrollar, enrollarse…
in Portuguese cacho…
in German locken, sich rollen…
in Catalan rínxol…
in Japanese カール…
in Chinese (Simplified) 鬈发,卷发, 卷曲物,螺旋状物…
(Definition of curl from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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