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English definition of “cut”

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cut

verb uk   /kʌt/ ( present participle cutting, past tense and past participle cut) us  

cut verb (USE KNIFE)

A2 [I or T] to break the surface of something, or to divide or make something smaller, using a sharp tool, especially a knife: to cut a slice of bread I've cut myself/my hand on that glass/with that knife. Cut the meat up into small pieces. This knife doesn't cut very well. Where did you have your hair cut? [+ obj + adj ] Firefighters had to cut the trapped driver loose/free (= cut the metal to allow the driver to get out of the car) using special equipment. He fell off the swing and cut his head open (= got a deep cut in his head). He cut the cake in/into six (pieces) and gave each child a slice.
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cut verb (REDUCE)

B2 [T] to make something shorter, lower, smaller, etc.: to cut prices/costs to cut overtime/wages
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cut verb (REMOVE)

B2 [T] to remove something from something else: The sex scenes had been cut out of the American version of the film.cut and paste to move words or pictures from one place to another in a computer documentcut sb out of your will to decide not to leave someone any of your money or possessions when you die
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cut verb (MISS)

[T] mainly US informal to not go, especially to a place where you should be: Your son has been cutting classes.

cut verb (STOP)

[I or T] to stop or interrupt something: to cut an engine/a motor "Cut! (= stop filming!)" shouted the director.cut sb short to stop someone from talking before they have finished what they were saying: He started to explain, but she cut him short.cut it/that out! informal used to tell someone to stop talking or stop behaving in an annoying way: Just cut it out! I've had enough of your silly jokes.

cut verb (GROW TEETH)

cut a tooth (of a baby) to grow a new tooth: The baby's cutting a tooth. That's why she's crying.

cut verb (TAKE SHORT WAY)

[I usually + adv/prep] to go through or across a place, especially in order to get somewhere quickly: to cut through a passagecut a corner UK to fail to keep to your own side of the road when going round a corner

cut verb (CARDS)

[I or T] to choose a playing card by dividing a pile of cards into two parts: Who's going to cut the cards?

cut verb (RECORD)

[T] to record music or speech on a record: When did the Stones cut their first record?

cut

noun uk   /kʌt/ us  

cut noun (INJURY)

B1 [C] an injury made when the skin is cut with something sharp: a deep cut

cut noun (MEAT)

[C] a piece of meat cut from a particular part of an animal: Sirloin is the most expensive cut of beef.

cut noun (STYLE)

[S] the shape into which something is cut: I don't like the cut of these jeans.

cut noun (REDUCTION)

C1 [C] a reduction in the number, amount, or rate of something: a cut in expenditure/interest rates/hospital waiting listscuts [plural] reductions in public spending: Students and workers were out on the streets protesting against the cuts.

cut noun (PART REMOVED)

[C] the act of removing a part from a book, film, etc., or a part that is removed: The movie contains some very violent scenes, so some cuts were made when it was shown on TV.

cut noun (SHARE)

[S] informal a share of something, usually money: When am I going to get my cut?

cut noun (PASSAGE)

US ( UK cutting) a deep, narrow passage made through a hill for a road, railway, or canal
(Definition of cut from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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