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English definition of “dash”

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dash

verb uk   /dæʃ/ us  

dash verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

B2 [I] to go somewhere quickly: The dog ran off, and she dashed after him. UK I've been dashing around all day. UK I must dash - I've got to be home by seven.
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dash verb (HIT)

[I or T, usually + prep] to hit something with great force, especially causing damage: The tidal wave dashed the ship against the rocks. Waves dashed against the cliffs.
Phrasal verbs

dash

noun uk   /dæʃ/ us  

dash noun (QUICK MOVEMENT)

B2 [S] the act of running somewhere very quickly: I made a dash for the bathroom. There was a mad dash for the exit. As soon as the rain dies down I'm going to make a dash for it (= run somewhere very fast). [C usually singular] mainly US a race over a short distance: Who won the 100-yard dash?
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dash noun (PUNCTUATION)

B2 [C] the symbol – used to separate parts of a sentence
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[C] a long sound or flash of light that is used with dots to send messages in Morse (code)

dash noun (SMALL AMOUNT)

a dash C2 a small amount of something, especially liquid food, that is added to something else: Add some butter and a dash of salt. "Cream with your coffee, Madam?" "Yes please - just a dash." figurative A scarf adds a dash of (= a small amount of) sophistication.

dash noun (STYLE)

[U] old-fashioned style and confidence

dash

exclamation uk   /dæʃ/ UK old-fashioned informal us  
used to express anger: Oh dash (it)! I've left my umbrella in the office.
(Definition of dash from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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