Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “day”

day

noun [C] uk   /deɪ/ us  
A1 a period of 24 hours, especially from twelve o'clock one night to twelve o'clock the next night: January has 31 days. the days of the week He runs five miles every day. It took us almost a day to get here. I saw him the day before yesterday. We leave the day after tomorrow. He was last seen alive five days ago. They haven't been seen for days (= for several days). I'll be seeing Pat in a few days/in a few days' time. How's your day been? (= Have you enjoyed today?) Have a nice day! I must get some sleep - I've got a big day (= an important day) tomorrow. A2 used to refer to the period in 24 hours when it is naturally light: a bright sunny day It's rained all day today. These animals sleep during the day and hunt at night. A2 the time that you usually spend at work or at school: a normal working day I work a seven-hour day. We're having to work a six-day week to cope with demand. day off a day when you do not have to work, or do something that you normally do: I won't be in on Thursday; it's my day off. She's taking three days off next week. the other day B1 a few days ago: Didn't I see you in the post office the other day? these days A2 used to talk about the present time, in comparison with the past: Vegetarianism is very popular these days. in those days B2 in the past: In those days people used to write a lot more letters. any day now B2 very soon, especially within the next few days: The baby's due any day now. by day when it is naturally light: I prefer travelling by day. day after day B1 repeatedly, every day: The same problems keep coming up day after day. day and night all the time: You can hear the traffic from your room day and night. day by day B2 every day, or more and more as each day passes: Day by day he became weaker. (from) day to day If something changes (from) day to day, it changes often: The symptoms of the disease change from day to day. the days C1 a period in history: How did people communicate in the days before email? to this day up to and including the present moment: To this day nobody knows what happened to him.
(Definition of day from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of day?
Browse related topics

You are looking at an entry to do with Good luck and bad luck, but you might be interested in these topics from the Chance and possibility topic area:

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “day” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

light at the end of the tunnel

signs of improvement in a situation that has been bad for a long time, or signs that a long and difficult piece of work is almost finished

Word of the Day

The language of work

by Kate Woodford,
October 15, 2014
Most of us talk about our jobs. We tell our family and friends interesting or funny things that have happened in the workplace (=room where we do our job), we describe – and sometimes complain about – our bosses and colleagues and when we meet someone for the first time, we tell

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More