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English definition of “dead”

dead

adjective uk   /ded/ us  

dead adjective (NOT LIVING)

A2 not now living: She's been dead for 20 years now. The motorcyclist was dead on arrival at the hospital. He was shot dead (= killed by shooting) outside his home. C2 mainly UK If a part of your body is dead, you cannot feel it: I've been sitting with my legs crossed for so long, my right leg has gone dead.

dead adjective (NOT IN USE)

UK describes empty glasses and bottles that were previously full In some sports, if a ball is dead, it is outside the area of play.

dead adjective (BORING)

C2 If a place is dead, it is too quiet and nothing interesting happens there: The city centre's quite lively during the day, but it's totally dead at night.

dead adjective (EQUIPMENT)

B2 If a piece of equipment is dead, it is not working: a dead battery The phone suddenly went dead.

dead

adjective [before noun], adverb uk   /ded/ us  
C1 complete(ly): The conductor waited for dead silence before commencing the performance. You won't be able to change his mind - he's dead against the plan.informal I'm dead certain I left my purse on the desk.informal I'm dead (= very) hungry.informal The exam was dead (= very) easy.UK informal "How was the film?" "It was dead good." The post office is dead (= straight) ahead. Aim for the dead (= exact) centre of the target. I always try to arrive dead (= exactly) on time. Martha's dead set on having (= very much wants to have) a new bike. He's dead set against (= completely opposed to) living in the city.

dead

noun uk   /ded/ us  
the dead [plural] dead people: Three children were among the dead. A ceasefire has been called to allow the survivors to bury their dead.
(Definition of dead from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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