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English definition of “defeat”

defeat

verb [T] uk   /dɪˈfiːt/ us  
B1 to win against someone in a fight, war, or competition: Napoleon was defeated by the Duke of Wellington at the battle of Waterloo. If we can defeat the Italian team, we'll be through to the final. B2 to cause someone or something to fail: The proposal to change the rules was narrowly (= only just) defeated by 201 votes to 196. Our ambitions for this tournament have been defeated by the weather. I'm afraid anything that involves language learning has always defeated me (= I have been unable to do it).

defeat

noun [C or U] uk   /dɪˈfiːt/ us  
B1 the fact of losing against someone in a fight or competition, or when someone or something is made to fail: At the last General Election, they suffered a crushing/humiliating defeat. After their defeat in battle, the soldiers surrendered. She admitted/conceded defeat well before all the votes had been counted.
Compare
admit defeat to accept that you cannot do something: I thought I could mend the radio myself, but I've had to admit defeat.
(Definition of defeat from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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