defect Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "defect" - English Dictionary

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defectnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈdiː.fekt/
C1 a fault or problem in something or someone that spoils that thing or person or causes it, him, or her not to work correctly: All the company's aircraft have been grounded, after a defect in the engine cooling system was discovered. There are so many defects in our education system. It's a character defect in her that she can't ever admit she's wrong. a physical condition in which something is wrong with a part of someone's body: She suffers from a heart/sight/speech defect. The drug has been shown to cause birth defects. Cystic fibrosis is caused by a genetic defect.

defectverb [I]

uk   us   /dɪˈfekt/
to leave a country, political party, etc., especially in order to join an opposing one: When the national hockey team visited the US, half the players defected. The British spy, Kim Philby, defected to the Soviet Union/defected from Britain in 1963.
defector
noun [C] uk   /dɪˈfek.tər/  us   /-tɚ/
She was one of many Communist Party defectors.
Translations of “defect”
in Vietnamese khuyết điểm…
in Spanish defecto…
in Thai ข้อบกพร่อง…
in Malaysian belot…
in French défaut…
in German der Fehler…
in Chinese (Traditional) 缺點, 缺陷, 瑕疵…
in Indonesian cacat…
in Russian дефект, неисправность…
in Turkish kusur, eksik…
in Chinese (Simplified) 缺点, 缺陷, 瑕疵…
in Polish wada, defekt, usterka…
(Definition of defect from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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