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English definition of “defence”

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defence

noun uk UK ( US defense)   /dɪˈfens/ us  

defence noun (PROTECTION)

A2 [C or U] protection or support against attack, criticism, or infection: The rebels' only form of defence against the soldiers' guns was sticks and stones. The war has ended but government spending on defence (= the country's armed forces) is still increasing. When Helen criticized me, Chris came/rushed to my defence (= quickly supported me). The book is a closely argued defence of (= something that supports) the economic theory of Keynes. The towers were once an important part of the city's defences. A good diet helps build the body's natural defences.
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defence noun (EXPLANATION)

[S or U] an argument or explanation that you use to prove that you are not guilty of something: The judge remarked that ignorance was not a valid defence. All I can say, in defence of my actions, is that I had little choice. the things said in court to prove that a person did not commit a crime: She said that she didn't want a lawyer and was going to conduct her own defence.the defence C2 the person or people in a law case who have been accused of doing something illegal, and their lawyer(s): a witness for the defence a defence lawyer

defence noun (SPORT)

B1 [S or U] in some sports, the part of a team that tries to prevent the other team from scoring goals or points: a strong defence I play in defence.

defence noun (CHESS)

specialized games [C or U] in the game of chess , a particular set of moves used by the person playing with the black pieces: What defence did you use in that last game?
(Definition of defence from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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