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English definition of “defend”

defend

verb uk   /dɪˈfend/ us  

defend verb (PROTECT)

B1 [T] to protect someone or something against attack or criticism; to speak in favour of someone or something: How can we defend our homeland if we don't have an army? White blood cells help defend the body against infection. They are fighting to defend their beliefs/interests/rights. He vigorously defended his point of view. The Bank of England intervened this morning to defend the pound (= stop it from losing value). The prime minister was asked how he could defend (= explain his support for) a policy that increased unemployment. I'm going to karate lessons to learn how to defend myself.
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defend verb (IN COURT OF LAW)

to act as a lawyer for someone who has been accused of something in a court of law and try to prove that they are not guilty : I can't afford a lawyer so I shall defend myself (= argue my own case in a law court).

defend verb (SPORT)

[T] to compete in a sports competition that you won before and try to win it again: He will defend his 1500 metre title at the weekend. The defending champion will play her first match of the tournament tomorrow. [I] to try to prevent the opposing player or players from scoring points, goals, etc. in a sport: In the last ten minutes of the match, we needed to defend.
(Definition of defend from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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