Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “degree”

See all translations

degree

noun uk   /dɪˈɡriː/ us  

degree noun (AMOUNT)

B2 [C usually singular, U] (an) amount or level of something: This job demands a high degree of skill. There isn't the slightest degree of doubt that he's innocent. I have to warn you that there's a degree of (= some) danger involved in this. The number of terrorist attacks has increased to a terrifying degree. There was some degree of truth in what she said. To what degree do you think we will be providing a better service? "That's really bad." "Well, it's all a matter/question of degree (= there are other things better and other things worse)."
More examples

degree noun (UNIT)

A2 [C] ( written abbreviation deg.) any of various units of measurement, especially of temperature or angles, usually shown by the symbol ° written after a number: a difference of three degrees Water boils at 212° Fahrenheit and 100° Celsius/Centigrade. A right angle is an angle of 90°. New York is on a latitude of 41°N and a longitude of 74°W.
More examples

degree noun (SUBJECT OF STUDY)

B1 [C] a course of study at a college or university, or the qualification given to a student after he or she has completed his or her studies: She has a physics degree/a degree in physics from Edinburgh. mainly US She has a bachelor's/master's degree in history from Yale. UK "What degree did you do at York?" "Geography."
More examples
(Definition of degree noun from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of degree?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “degree” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

work out

to exercise in order to improve the strength or appearance of your body

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Read More