dice definition, meaning - what is dice in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “dice”

See all translations

dice

noun [C] uk   us   /daɪs/ (plural dice)

dice noun [C] (GAME)

C2 (US also or old use die) a small cube (= object with six equal square sides) with a different number of spots on each side, used in games involving chance: We need two dice to play the game. You roll/throw the dice and whoever gets the highest score goes first. [U] any game involving chance in which dice are thrown: Let's play dice.
More examples

dice noun [C] (PIECE)

a small square piece of something: Cut the potatoes into small dice.
Idioms

dice

verb uk   us   /daɪs/

dice verb (CUT)

C2 [T] to cut food into small squares: Peel and dice the potatoes. diced carrots

dice verb (GAME)

dice with death to do something extremely dangerous and silly: You're dicing with death driving at that speed on icy roads.
Translations of “dice”
in Arabic الزَّهْر…
in Korean 주사위…
in Malaysian dadu…
in French dé…
in Turkish zar…
in Italian dado…
in Chinese (Traditional) 遊戲, 骰子, 擲骰子類遊戲…
in Russian кубик для игры…
in Polish kostka (do gry)…
in Vietnamese súc sắc…
in Spanish dado…
in Portuguese dado…
in Thai ลูกเต๋า…
in German der Würfel…
in Catalan dau…
in Japanese さいころ…
in Indonesian dadu…
in Chinese (Simplified) 游戏, 骰子, 掷骰子类游戏…
(Definition of dice from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of dice?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “dice” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

force somebody's hand

to make someone do something they do not want to do, or act sooner than they had intended

Word of the Day

They sometimes go here and they never go there: using adverbs of frequency

by Liz Walter,
April 29, 2015
Sometimes, always, often, never: these are some of the most common words in English.  Unfortunately, they are also some of the words that cause the most problems for students. Many of my students put them in the wrong place, often because that’s where they go in their own languages. They say things

Read More 

Evel abbreviation

May 04, 2015
English votes for English laws; the idea that only English (as opposed to Scottish, Welsh or Irish) MPs should be allowed to vote for laws that affect only England Yet these are the two principal constitutional proposals that have come from the Conservative party in its kneejerk response to Ukip’s English nationalism and

Read More