die definition, meaning - what is die in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “die”

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die

verb [I] uk   us   /daɪ/ (present participle dying, past tense and past participle died)
A1 to stop living or existing, either suddenly or slowly: Twelve people died in the accident. She died of/from hunger/cancer/a heart attack/her injuries. It is a brave person who will die for their beliefs. I would like to die in my sleep (= while I am sleeping). Many people have a fear of dying. Our love will never die. She will not tell anyone - the secret will die with her.die a natural/violent death to die naturally, violently, etc.: He died a violent death. My grandmother died a natural death (= did not die of illness or because she was killed), as she would have wanted. informal If a machine stops working, or if an object cannot be used or repaired any more, usually because it is very old, people sometimes say it has died: The engine just died on us.humorous He wore his jeans until they died.
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die

noun [C] uk   us   /daɪ/

die noun [C] (TOOL)

a shaped piece or mould (= hollow container) made of metal or other hard material, used to shape or put a pattern on metal or plastic

die noun [C] (GAME)

US also or old use (UK dice) a small cube (= object with six equal square sides) with a different number of spots on each side, used in games involving chance
(Definition of die from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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