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English definition of “difference”

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difference

noun uk   /ˈdɪf.ər.əns/ us    /-ɚ-/

difference noun (NOT THE SAME)

A2 [C or U] the way in which two or more things which you are comparing are not the same: What's the difference between an ape and a monkey? Is there any significant difference in quality between these two items?make a (big) difference B2 ( also make all the difference) to improve a situation (a lot): Exercise can make a big difference to your state of health. Putting up some new wallpaper has made all the difference to the place.not make any difference B2 ( also not make the slightest difference) to not change a situation in any way: You can ask him again if you want, but it won't make any difference - he'll still say no. It makes no difference where you put the plants - they won't grow in this soil.with a difference used to say that something is unusual, and more interesting or better than other things of the same type: Try new Cremetti - the ice cream with a difference.
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difference noun (NOT AGREEING)

C2 [C usually plural] a disagreement: They had a terrible argument a few weeks ago, but now they've settled/resolved their differences.have a difference of opinion to disagree: They had a difference of opinion about/over their child's education.

difference noun (AMOUNT)

B1 [C or U] the amount by which one thing is different from another: a(n) age/price/temperature difference There's a big difference in age between them. There's a difference of eight years between them.
(Definition of difference from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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