dig definition, meaning - what is dig in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “dig”

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dig

verb uk   us   /dɪɡ/ (present participle digging, past tense and past participle dug)

dig verb (MOVE SOIL)

B1 [I or T] to break up and move soil using a tool, a machine, or your hands: Digging (in) the garden is good exercise.B2 [T] to form a hole by moving soil: The tunnel was dug with the aid of heavy machinery. The dog was digging a hole to hide its bone in.
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dig verb (SEARCH)

[I usually + adv/prep] to search somewhere when you are looking for an object or information : He dug into his pocket and took out a few coins. As I dug deeper into his past (= found out more about it), I realized that there was a lot about this man that I didn't know.

dig verb (PRESS)

dig sb in the ribs to push the side of someone's body quickly with your elbow (= the middle part of the arm where it bends) often as a way of sharing a private joke with that person or to get their attention

dig verb (APPROVE)

[T] old-fashioned slang to like or understand something: Hey, I really dig those shoes! You dig my meaning, man?

dig

noun [C] uk   us   /dɪɡ/

dig noun [C] (REMARK)

a remark that is intended to criticize, embarrass, or make a joke about someone: He's always taking digs/a dig at me.UK also He's always having/making dig/a dig at me.

dig noun [C] (REMOVE SOIL)

dig noun [C] (ACCOMMODATION)

digs [plural] mainly UK informal for lodgings : Many students in London have to live in digs.
(Definition of dig from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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