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English definition of “direct”

direct

adjective uk   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪ-/ us  

direct adjective (STRAIGHT)

B1 going in a straight line towards somewhere or someone without stopping or changing direction: a direct route/line Is there a direct train to Edinburgh?Describing angles, lines and orientations B2 without anyone or anything else being involved or between: She decided to take direct control of the project. He denied that he had any direct involvement in the deal. Have you any direct experience of this kind of work? He left as a direct result/consequence of what she said. There is a direct link/connection between smoking and lung cancer.Closeness in distance and timeAbout to happen direct light/heat strong light or heat that has nothing protecting and separating you from it: This plant should be kept out of direct sunlight.Physically strong and powerful direct relation/relative/descendant a relation who is related to you through one of your parents, not through an aunt or uncle, etc.: Diana is a direct descendant of Robert Peel.Family relations in general

direct adjective (COMPLETE)

complete: a direct contrast She's very thoughtful - the direct opposite of her sister.Complete and wholeVery and extreme

direct adjective (HONEST)

C1 describes someone who says what they think in a very honest way without worrying about other people's opinions: I like her open and direct manner.Blunt and direct in speech and behaviourNot saying muchNot being friendly
directness
noun [U] uk   /-nəs/ us  

direct

adverb uk   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪ-/ us  

direct adverb (STRAIGHT)

B1 in a straight line towards somewhere without stopping or changing direction: Does this train go direct to the airport? B1 without anyone or anything else being involved or between: I intended to go direct to the manager with my complaint.

direct

verb uk   us  

direct verb (CONTROL)

C1 [T] to control or be in charge of an activity, organization, etc.: She directs a large charity.Managing and organizing C1 [T] to tell people the direction in which they must drive: There was a police officer directing the traffic. B1 [I or T] to be in charge of a film or play and tell the actors how to play their parts: He wanted to give up acting and start directing (his own films). "Jaws" was directed by Steven Spielberg.
Compare
Production, direction and recording

direct verb (AIM)

C1 [T usually + adv/prep] to aim something in a particular direction: Was that remark directed at/towards me? Criticism was directed against/at the manufacturers of the product.Aiming and aimHandguns and rifles

direct verb (SAY WHERE)

B1 [T] to tell someone how to get somewhere: Could you direct me to the airport? I couldn't find the station, so I asked someone if they could direct me.Taking someone somewhere or telling them the way

direct verb (ORDER)

[T + obj + to infinitive ] formal to order someone, especially officially: The judge directed the defendant to remain silent.Giving orders and commands

direct

adverb uk   us  
without having to stop or change direction: Does this train go direct to Edinburgh?Travelling without anything or anyone else being involved or in between: Can I dial this number direct or do I have to go through the switchboard?Travelling
(Definition of direct from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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