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English definition of “directly”

directly

adverb uk   /daɪˈrekt.li/ /dɪ-/ us  

directly adverb (STRAIGHT)

B1 without anything else being involved or in between: Our hotel room was directly above a building site. The disease is directly linked to poor drainage systems. The sun shone directly in my eyes.

directly adverb (HONEST)

B2 honestly, even when it might make people feel uncomfortable: Let me answer that question directly. "Did you tell him to go?" "Not directly, no."

directly adverb (SOON)

old-fashioned or formal very soon: Dr Schwarz will be with you directly. old-fashioned immediately: When you get home you're going directly to bed.

directly

conjunction uk   /daɪˈrekt.li/ /dɪ-/ us  
formal immediately after: Directly he was paid, he went out shopping. formal as soon as: I'll be with you directly I've finished this letter.
(Definition of directly from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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