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English definition of “disaster”

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disaster

noun [C or U] uk   /dɪˈzɑː.stər/ us    /-ˈzæs.tɚ/
B2 (an event that results in) great harm, damage, or death, or serious difficulty: An inquiry was ordered into the recent rail disaster (= a serious train accident). It would be a disaster for me if I lost my job. This is one of the worst natural disasters ever to befall the area. Heavy and prolonged rain can spell disaster for many plants. Everything was going smoothly until suddenly disaster struck. Inviting James and Ivan to dinner on the same evening was a recipe for disaster (= caused a very difficult situation) - they always argue with each other.be a disaster B2 informal to be very unsuccessful or extremely bad: The evening was a complete disaster. As an engineer, he was a disaster.
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Translations of “disaster”
in Korean 재난, 재앙…
in Arabic كارِثة, نَكْبة…
in French désastre…
in Turkish felaket, âfet, yıkım…
in Italian disastro…
in Chinese (Traditional) 災難,大禍…
in Russian бедствие, катастрофа…
in Polish klęska, katastrofa…
in Spanish desastre…
in Portuguese desastre…
in German die Katastrophe…
in Catalan desastre…
in Japanese 災害, 大惨事, 大失敗…
in Chinese (Simplified) 灾难,大祸…
(Definition of disaster from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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