dread definition, meaning - what is dread in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “dread”

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dread

verb [T] uk   us   /dred/
C2 to feel extremely worried or frightened about something that is going to happen or that might happen: He's dreading the exam - he's sure he's going to fail. [+ -ing verb] I'm dreading having to meet his parents.dread to think C2 used to say that you do not want to think about something because it is too worrying: I dread to think what would happen if he was left to cope on his own.
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dread

noun [U] uk   us   /dred/
a strong feeling of fear or worry: The prospect of working full-time fills me with dread. I live in dread of bumping into her in the street.
dread
adjective [before noun] uk   us   formal
The dread spectre of civil war looms over the country.
dreaded
adjective [before noun] uk   us   /ˈdred.ɪd/ humorous
My dreaded cousin is coming to stay!
Translations of “dread”
in Arabic رَهبة, فَزع…
in Korean 몹시 무서움…
in Malaysian sangat takut…
in French terreur…
in Turkish dehşete kapılmak, korkmak, ödü kopmak…
in Italian terrore…
in Chinese (Traditional) 對…感到恐懼, 害怕, 擔心…
in Russian бояться, страшиться…
in Polish obawiać się, bać się…
in Vietnamese sự khiếp sợ…
in Spanish terror…
in Portuguese medo, pavor…
in Thai ความหวาดกลัว…
in German die Furcht…
in Catalan pànic…
in Japanese 恐怖, 不安…
in Indonesian ketakutan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 对…感到恐惧, 害怕, 担心…
(Definition of dread from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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