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English definition of “dress”

dress

noun uk   /dres/ us  
A1 [C] a piece of clothing for women or girls that covers the top half of the body and hangs down over the legs: a long/short dress a wedding dress B2 [U] used, especially in combination, to refer to clothes of a particular type, especially those worn in particular situations: The queen, in full ceremonial dress, presided over the ceremony.

dress

verb uk   /dres/ us  

dress verb (PUT ON CLOTHES)

A2 [I or T] to put clothes on yourself or someone else, especially a child: My husband dresses the children while I make breakfast. He left very early and had to dress in the dark. B1 [I + adv/prep] to wear a particular type of clothes: I have to dress quite smartly for work. Patricia always dresses in black (= wears black clothes). dress for dinner to put on formal clothes for a meal: It's the sort of hotel where you're expected to dress for dinner.

dress verb (PREPARE FOOD)

[T] to add a liquid, especially a mixture of oil and vinegar, to a salad for extra flavour: a dressed salad [T] to prepare meat, chicken, fish, or crab so it can be eaten: a whole dressed crab

dress verb (TREAT INJURY)

[T] to treat an injury by cleaning it and putting medicine or a covering on it to protect it: Clean and dress the wound immediately.

dress verb (SHOP WINDOW)

[T] to decorate a shop window usually with an arrangement of the shop's goods: They're dressing Harrods' windows for Christmas.

dress

adjective [before noun] uk   /dres/ us  
describes men's suits, shirts, or other clothes of the type that are worn at formal occasions: a white dress shirt and bow tie
(Definition of dress from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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