Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “due”

See all translations

due

adjective uk   /djuː/ us    /duː/

due adjective (EXPECTED)

B1 expected to happen, arrive, etc. at a particular time: What time is the next bus due? The next meeting is due to be held in three months' time. Their first baby is due in January.in due course B2 formal at a suitable time in the future: You will receive notification of the results in due course.
More examples

due adjective (RESULTING)

due to
More examples
B1 because of: A lot of her unhappiness is due to boredom. The bus was delayed due to heavy snow.

due adjective (OWED)

C2 owed as a debt or as a right: The rent is due (= should be paid) at the end of the month. £50 is due to me ( US due me) from the people I worked for last month. Our thanks are due to everyone. UK law He was found to have been driving without due (= the necessary) care and attention.be due for sth C1 If you are due for something, you expect to receive it, because you deserve it: I'm due for a promotion soon.

due

noun uk   /djuː/ us    /duː/
give sb their due said when you are praising someone for something good they have done, although you dislike other things about them: He failed again, but to give him his due, he did try hard.dues [plural] the official payments that you make to an organization you belong to: Members of the society pay $1,000 in annual dues.

due

adverb uk   /djuː/ us    /duː/
in a direction that is straight towards the north, south, east, or west: From here, you go due east until you get to the Interstate.
(Definition of due from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of due?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “due” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

work out

to exercise in order to improve the strength or appearance of your body

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Read More