dummy definition, meaning - what is dummy in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “dummy”

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dummy

noun [C] uk   us   /ˈdʌm.i/

dummy noun [C] (MODEL)

a large model of a human, especially one used to show clothes in a shop: the dummies in the store windows a ventriloquist's dummyUK a shop dummy

dummy noun [C] (NOT REAL)

something that is not real and is used for practice or to deceive: The device is not a real bomb but a dummy. UK in some sports, especially football, an act of pretending to kick or hit the ball in a particular direction, in order to deceive the other players

dummy noun [C] (FOR BABY)

UK (US pacifier) a smooth rubber or plastic object that is given to a baby to suck in order to comfort it and make it stop crying

dummy noun [C] (STUPID PERSON)

(US also dumbbell) informal a stupid or silly person: You dummy - you don't know the answer! Only a dummy would ignore the safety warnings.

dummy

adjective [before noun] uk   us   /ˈdʌm.i/
not real: an enormous dummy perfume bottle in the shop window

dummy

verb [I or T] uk   us   /ˈdʌm.i/ UK
in games such as football or rugby, to pretend to kick or move a ball in a particular direction but instead do something completely different, in order to deceive the opposing team's players: Adams' cross was dummied by Novo at the front post, allowing Smith to score from close range.
(Definition of dummy from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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