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English definition of “dump”

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dump

verb [T] uk   /dʌmp/ us  

dump verb [T] (PUT DOWN)

C2 to put down or drop something in a careless way: He came in with four shopping bags and dumped them on the table.
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dump verb [T] (GET RID OF)

C1 to get rid of something unwanted, especially by leaving it in a place where it is not allowed to be: The tax was so unpopular that the government decided to dump it. Several old cars had been dumped near the beach. Toxic chemicals continue to be dumped into the river. to sell unwanted goods very cheaply, usually in other countries: They accused the West of dumping out-of-date medicines on Third World countries. specialized computing to move information from a computer's memory to another place or device

dump verb [T] (END RELATIONSHIP)

C2 informal to suddenly end a romantic relationship you have been having with someone: If he's so awful, why don't you just dump him?

dump

noun [C] uk   /dʌmp/ us  
C1 ( UK also rubbish dump, US also garbage dump) a place where people are allowed to leave their rubbish: I'm going to clean out the basement and take everything I don't want to the dump.C2 informal a very unpleasant and untidy place: His room is an complete dump! a place where things of a particular type are stored, especially by an army: an ammunition/arms/weapons/food dump specialized computing an act of moving information from a computer's memory to another place or device
(Definition of dump from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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