each definition, meaning - what is each in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “each”

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each

pronoun, determiner uk   us   /iːtʃ/
A1 every thing, person, etc. in a group of two or more, considered separately: When you run, each foot leaves the ground before the other comes down. There are five leaflets - please take one of each. Each of the companies supports a local charity. Each and every one of the flowers has its own colour and smell. We each (= every one of us) wanted the bedroom with the balcony, so we tossed a coin to decide. The bill comes to £79, so that's about £10 each.each to his/their own (also to each their own) used to say that everyone likes different things: You actually like modern jazz, do you? Each to their own.each way If you put an amount of money each way on a horse race, you will win money if the horse you have chosen comes first, second, or third.
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Translations of “each”
in Arabic كُلّ…
in Korean 각각…
in Malaysian setiap…
in French chaque…
in Turkish her, herbiri…
in Italian ciascuno, -a, ogni…
in Chinese (Traditional) (兩個或兩個以上物或人中的)每個,各,各自…
in Russian каждый…
in Polish każdy, dla każdego…
in Vietnamese mỗi…
in Spanish cada…
in Portuguese cada, cada um, cada uma…
in Thai แต่ละ…
in German jede(-r, -s)…
in Catalan cadascú, cadascun, -a…
in Japanese それぞれ…
in Indonesian setiap…
in Chinese (Simplified) (两个或两个以上物或人中的)每个,各,各自…
(Definition of each from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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