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English definition of “earth”

earth

noun uk   /ɜːθ/ us    /ɝːθ/

earth noun (PLANET)

B1 [S or U] (also Earth) the planet third in order of distance from the sun, between Venus and Mars; the world on which we live: The Earth takes approximately 3651/4 days to go round the sun. The circus has been described as the greatest show on earth (= in the world).

earth noun (GROUND)

B2 [S or U] the land surface of the world rather than the sky or sea: The earth was shaking and people rushed out of their houses in panic. He had enjoyed the voyage but was happy to feel the earth beneath his feet once more. B2 the usually brown, heavy and loose substance of which a large part of the surface of the ground is made, and in which plants can grow: The ploughed earth looked rich and dark and fertile.

earth noun (WIRE)

[C usually singular] UK (US ground) a wire that makes a connection between a piece of electrical equipment and the ground, so the user is protected from feeling an electric shock if the equipment develops a fault

earth noun (HOLE)

[C] a hole in the ground where an animal such as a fox lives

earth

verb [T usually passive] uk   /ɜːθ/ us    /ɝːθ/ UK (US ground)
to put an earth (= wire) between a piece of electrical equipment and the ground: You could get a nasty shock from that water heater if it isn't earthed properly.
(Definition of earth from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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