Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “enter”

enter

verb uk   /ˈen.tər/ us    /-t̬ɚ/

enter verb (PLACE)

A2 [I or T] to come or go into a particular place: The police entered (the building) through/by the side door. You will begin to feel sleepy as the drug enters the bloodstream.

enter verb (COMPETITION)

B1 [I or T] to be included in a competition, race, or exam, or to arrange for someone else to do this: Both men have been entered for/in the 100 metres in Paris next month. All three companies have entered the race to develop a new system. Are you going to enter the photography competition?

enter verb (INFORMATION)

B1 [T] to put information into a computer, book, or document: You have to enter a password to access the database. [T] formal to make a particular type of statement officially: The prisoner entered a plea of not guilty.

enter verb (ORGANIZATION)

[T] to become a member of a particular organization, or to start working in a particular type of job: Ms Doughty entered politics/Parliament after a career in banking.

enter verb (PERIOD)

C1 [T] to begin a period of time: The project is entering its final stages. The violence is now entering its third week.

enter

noun [S] uk   /ˈen.tər/ us    /-t̬ɚ/
the key on a computer keyboard that is used to say that the words or numbers on the screen are correct, or to say that an instruction should be performed, or to move down a line on the screen: Move the cursor to where it says 'New File' and press enter.
(Definition of enter from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of enter?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “enter” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

for starters

used to say that something is the first in a list of things

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

ped-text verb

November 24, 2014
to text someone while walking I’m ped-texting, I’m looking down at my phone, 75 percent of the time.

Read More