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English definition of “entry”

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entry

noun uk   /ˈen.tri/ us  

entry noun (WAY IN)

B1 [C or U] the act of entering a place or joining a particular society or organization: A flock of sheep blocked our entry to the farm. I can't go down that street - there's a "No entry" sign. The actress's entry into the world of politics surprised most people. She made her entry to the ceremony surrounded by a group of photographers. The burglars gained entry by a top window. [C] a door, gate, etc. by which you enter a place: I'll wait for you at the entry to the park.
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entry noun (INFORMATION)

B1 [C] a separate piece of information that is recorded in a book, computer, etc.: They've updated a lot of the entries in the most recent edition of the encyclopedia. As his illness progressed, he made fewer entries in his diary.
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entry noun (COMPETITION)

B1 [C or U] a piece of work that you do in order to take part in a competition, or the act of taking part in a competition: There have been a fantastic number of entries for this year's poetry competition. the winning entries Entry to the competition is restricted to those who have a ticket. Have you filled in your entry form yet?
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(Definition of entry from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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