equity definition, meaning - what is equity in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “equity”

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equity

noun uk   /ˈek.wɪ.ti/  us   /-t̬i/

equity noun (VALUE)

[C or U] specialized finance & economics the value of a company, divided into many equal parts owned by the shareholders, or one of the equal parts into which the value of a company is divided: He sold his equity in the company last year. The rights give holders the opportunity to purchase additional equity interests in the company at a big discount. [U] the value of a property after you have paid any mortgage or other charges relating to it

equity noun (FAIRNESS)

[U] formal the situation in which everyone is treated fairly and equally: a society based on equity and social justice Note: The opposite of equity is inequity. [U] specialized law in English-speaking countries, a system of justice that allows a fair judgment of a case where the laws that already exist are not satisfactory
(Definition of equity from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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