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English definition of “erase”

erase

verb [T] uk   /ɪˈreɪz/ us    /-ˈreɪs/

erase verb [T] (MARK)

B2 mainly US (UK usually rub out) to remove something, especially a pencil mark by rubbing it: It's in pencil so you can just erase anything that's wrong.

erase verb [T] (RECORDING)

to remove recordings or information from a magnetic tape or disk: A virus erased my hard disk.

erase verb [T] (SOMETHING PAST)

to cause a feeling or memory, or a time to be completely forgotten: He is determined to erase the memory of a disappointing debut two years ago. Woods wants a convincing victory to erase doubts about his team's ability to reach the World Cup finals. One election cannot erase 65 years of a corrupt one-party political process. literary to remove or destroy someone or something, or anything showing that that person or thing ever existed or happened: The president said NATO expansion would finally erase the boundary line in Europe artificially created by the Cold War. Years of hard living had blurred but not erased her girlhood beauty. He was a man of mystery - erased from the history books.
erasure
noun [C or U] uk   /ɪˈreɪ.ʒər/ us    /-ʒɚ/
the act of erasing something: the nuclear erasure of entire populations the erasure of police audiotapes
(Definition of erase from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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