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English definition of “escape”

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escape

verb uk   /ɪˈskeɪp/ us  

escape verb (GET FREE)

B1 [I or T] to get free from something, or to avoid something: Two prisoners have escaped. A lion has escaped from its cage. She was lucky to escape serious injury. He narrowly (= only just) escaped a fine. His name escapes me (= I have forgotten his name). Nothing important escapes her notice/attention.
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escape verb (COMPUTER)

[I] specialized computing to press the key on a computer keyboard that allows you to leave a particular screen and return to the previous one or to interrupt a process: Escape from this window and return to the main menu.

escape

noun uk   /ɪˈskeɪp/ us  

escape noun (GET FREE)

C1 [C or U] the act of successfully getting out of a place or a dangerous or bad situation: He made his escape on the back of a motorcycle. an escape route They had a narrow escape (= only just avoided injury or death) when their car crashed. [C] a loss that happens by accident: an escape of radioactivity
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escape noun (FORGET)

B2 [S] something that helps you to forget about your usual life or problems: Romantic novels provide an escape from reality.

escape noun (COMPUTER)

[U] ( also escape key, written abbreviation Esc) specialized the key on a computer keyboard that allows you to leave a particular screen and return to the previous one or to interrupt a process: Press Esc to return to the main menu.
(Definition of escape from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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