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English definition of “exchange”

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exchange

noun uk   /ɪksˈtʃeɪndʒ/ us  

exchange noun (GIVING AND GETTING)

B1 [C or U] the act of giving something to someone and them giving you something else: an exchange of ideas/information They were given food and shelter in exchange for work. She proposes an exchange of contracts at two o'clock. Several people were killed during the exchange of gunfire.
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exchange noun (CONVERSATION)

[C] a short conversation or argument: There was a brief exchange between the two leaders.
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exchange noun (STUDENTS)

B1 [C] an arrangement in which students from one country go to stay with students from another country: Are you going on the French exchange this year? a German exchange student

exchange noun (STOCK EXCHANGE)

exchange

verb [T] uk   /ɪksˈtʃeɪndʒ/ us  
B1 to give something to someone and receive something from that person: It's traditional for the two teams to exchange shirts after the game. Every month the group meets so its members can exchange their views/opinions (= have a discussion). We exchanged greetings before the meeting. We can exchange addresses when we see each other. Exchanging houses (= going to live in someone else's house while they live in yours) for a few weeks is a good way of having a holiday. to take something back to a shop where it was bought and get something else instead: If you don't like the gift, you can exchange it. I exchanged those trousers for a larger size.
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exchangeable
adjective uk   /-ˈtʃeɪn.dʒə.bl̩/ us  
Goods are exchangeable as long as they are returned in good condition.
(Definition of exchange from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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