Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “extent”

extent

noun [S or U] uk   /ɪkˈstent/ us  
B2 area or length; amount: From the top of the Empire State Building, you can see the full extent of Manhattan (= the area it covers). We don't yet know the extent of his injuries (= how bad his injuries are). Rosie's teacher was impressed by the extent of her knowledge (= how much she knew). The River Nile is over 6,500 kilometres in extent (= length). the extent to which C2 the degree to which something happens or is likely to happen: She had not realized the extent to which the children had been affected. to the extent of so strongly that: Some people hold their beliefs very strongly, even to the extent of being prepared to go to prison for them. to the extent that to a particular degree or stage, often causing particular results: Sales have fallen badly this year, to the extent that we will have to close some of our shops. to the same extent to the same degree as; as much as: The rich will not benefit from the proposed changes to the tax system to the same extent as the lower paid. to some extent B2 partly: To some extent, she was responsible for the accident. to such an extent so much: The car was damaged to such an extent that it couldn't be repaired. to what extent? how much: To what extent will the budget have to be modified? To what extent do you think he's aware of the problem?
(Definition of extent from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of extent?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “extent” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

give the green light to sth

to give permission for someone to do something or for something to happen

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More