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English definition of “fake”

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fake

noun [C] uk   /feɪk/ us  
C2 an object that is made to look real or valuable in order to deceive people: Experts revealed that the painting was a fake. The gun in his hand was a fake.C2 someone who is not what or who they claim to be: After working for ten years as a doctor, he was exposed as a fake.

fake

adjective uk   /feɪk/ us  
C1 not real, but made to look or seem real: He was charged with possessing a fake passport. fake fur/blood disapproving showing or pretending to feel emotions that are not sincere: a fake smile/laugh She's so fake, pretending to be everybody's friend.

fake

verb uk   /feɪk/ us  

fake verb (FEELING/ILLNESS)

C2 [I or T] to pretend that you have a feeling or illness: to fake surprise to fake an orgasm She didn't want to go out, so she faked a headache. He faked a heart attack and persuaded prison staff to take him to hospital. He isn't really crying, he's just faking.

fake verb (OBJECT)

C2 [T] to make an object look real or valuable in order to deceive people: to fake a document/signature
faker
noun [C] uk   /ˈfeɪ.kər/ us    /-kɚ/
Translations of “fake”
in Korean 가짜의…
in Arabic مُزيّف…
in French faux, imposteur…
in Turkish sahte, taklit…
in Italian falso…
in Chinese (Traditional) 贗品, 假貨, 冒充者…
in Russian фальшивый, искусственный…
in Polish sztuczny, fałszywy…
in Spanish falsificación, impostor…
in Portuguese falso…
in German die Fälschung, der Schwindler…
in Catalan fals…
in Japanese にせものの…
in Chinese (Simplified) 赝品, 假货, 冒充者…
(Definition of fake from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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