fast definition, meaning - what is fast in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “fast”

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fast

adjective uk   /fɑːst/  us   /fæst/

fast adjective (QUICK)

A1 moving or happening quickly, or able to move or happen quickly: fast cars a fast swimmer Computers are getting faster all the time.UK The fast train (= one that stops at fewer stations and travels quickly) to London takes less than an hour. If your watch or clock is fast, it shows a time that is later than the correct time. specialized art used to refer to photographic film that allows you to take pictures when there is not much light or when things are moving quicklyfast and furious used to describe something that is full of speed and excitement: It's not a relaxing movie - it's pretty fast and furious.
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fast adjective (IMMORAL)

old-fashioned disapproving without moral principles: a fast crowd a fast woman

fast adjective (FIXED)

If the colour of a piece of clothing is fast, the colour does not come out of the cloth when it is washed.

fast

adverb uk   /fɑːst/  us   /fæst/
A2 quickly: The accident was caused by people driving too fast in bad conditions. You'll have to act fast. Children's publishing is a fast-growing business.
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fast

adverb, adjective uk   /fɑːst/  us   /fæst/

fast

noun [C] uk   /fɑːst/  us   /fæst/
a period of time when you eat no food: Hundreds of prisoners began a fast in protest about prison conditions.

fast

verb [I] uk   /fɑːst/  us   /fæst/
to eat no food for a period of time: One day a week he fasts for health reasons.
(Definition of fast from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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